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Image by greg frucci via Flickr

Perhaps I am romanticizing the experience of sailing to Bermuda…

Perhaps I am truely drawn to the Sea…

but…

I miss the Indigo Sea…

The experience is not over…

despite the damage to my little She…

despite the place I am in now…

She waits for me…and I will return to Her…

Nothing ever turns out the way we expect them to…

I know this…

I feel this…

I have not stopped permanently…it’s just a fork in the path…a wall to be challenged…

My little She…the Cuddy…

will be repaired…

will become the vessel I know she is capable of becoming…

She will sail again…and I will be at her helm…

My Father had my back as I stayed calm in a sea that was not…

if I had not…

I would not be here…

yet…I am…

I miss the intensity…

I miss the calm…

I miss the night sky as I sailed under a full moon…

I miss the winged vessel as I had a good wind at my back…

My course was changed as I sailed…

I am in a place of change…and it feels wonderful.

     Greg Frucci…July 3, 2011…Wilmington, NC

Two nights out of Bermuda, my autopilot quit functioning…yet I did not…I had no choice but to continue to my destination…and I did.  The funny thing is, I was angry at first because I just wanted to sleep for a while.  I tried for hours to set a course with the autopilot so I could catch a nap at night.  Around midnight on June 15…with only a 100 miles to go…the autopilot would spin the boat in a 360 degree circle.  I stood there frustrated for a moment.  I looked up into the night sky and noticed a full moon with no clouds.  The wind was perfect…10 to 15 knots out of the north west.   My sails were full…the diesel was off and I was hauling ass.  The full moon was so bright, I could see the horizon a full 360 degrees around me with the light of the moon reflecting on the water…my sails completely white from the moonlight.  All of these wonderful aspects of the night sail changed my frustration to complete happiness.  That night was one of the best sailing sessions of the crossing to Bermuda.  I was alone, yet I was pumped with adrenaline and enjoying the moment.  To top the night off, I looked up at one point around 3 am and noticed the most incredible shooting star…a meteor…I have ever seen.  The object as so close to me and the sea, that I noticed smaller objects coming off of the larger object…specks of light shooting off of the meteor with a tail very long…then it just disintegrated into nothing…beautiful.

I sailed all night…watching the sunrise the next morning.  My autopilot never functioned again which is one of the reasons why the Cuddy is still in Bermuda.  A solo sailor needs to sleep at some point and the autopilot is the one thing which will allow that to happen.  All the next day, I no longer cared that I could not sleep…the wind shifted to my back.  My big genoa sail was out to the starboard side…my mainsail was out to the port side and I sailed wing to wing all day long with 10 to 15 knot winds at my back…wonderful.

The next night, I was less than 30 miles off the coast of Bermuda, crossing the northern reef to the east side of the island.  With my eyes peeled to the horizon, a few hours after dark, I saw the first light of a land I had never been to before.  After a week at sea, without seeing land or another human being, I was excited to see the lights of land…that experience kept my spirits high and me awake another night.  As I approached land, I could see more and more lights of the town of St. Georges and the lighthouse of St. Davis.  As the sun rose the next day, I could see land with my excitement at it’s apex.  As I drew closer to the Town Cut entrance to St. Georges Harbor, I could actually smell land…something I did not expect…the smell was wonderful.

After more than 48 hours of being awake and the physicalness of sailing alone, I was completely exhausted, yet so fired up about making the voyage…700 miles alone at sea.  I docked at the Customs Dock, got off my little She and could not stand up straight…laughing at myself as I staggered into the Customs Office.  I never once got sick at sea…never even felt queasy…yet when the Customs Officer passed me some paperwork to fill out, I thought I was going to puke.  He laughed at me and said, “all you sailors are alike…go get some food, walk around for a little while and come back to finish your paper work.”  I got “land sick”…amazing…so I did what he said.  After completing my paperwork, I motored the Cuddy over to an anchorage and slept for about 15 hours.

Wonderful…and I miss the entire experience….all of it. 

—frucci🙂

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